I Never Promised You Much of a Rose Garden

Today I took care of some long overdue gardening chores by tending to a part of my yard that has been sadly neglected of late: my rose garden. It’s probably a bit of a euphemism to call it a rose garden. It’s actually just a strip of land along the south-facing side of our house in which I try to grow roses (with mixed success).

There are several reasons for my challenge with rose gardening. For starters, roses and Florida don’t naturally get along very well. By nature, roses prefer a cooler, more temperate climate with gentle rains spread out fairly evenly throughout the year. They’re quite happy in places like the British Isles or, in North America, along the Pacific Northwest. I hear they also do pretty well in the higher altitudes of East Africa (although they had to be imported there). Places like Central Florida, where we have long, hot summers featuring torrential downpours are just not part of their natural habitat.

There are varieties that have been specially developed for our climate, and I do find roses to be very pretty, so I have designated a section of my yard for rose gardening. The varieties adapted to our climate prefer full sun, so the south wall is ideal for them.

I actually prefer to grow native, or at least “Florida friendly” flowers, for reasons I’ll go into in a separate post. However, since the roses that grow here can only be propagated through grafts and cuttings, I decided that roses do not represent any kind of threat to the environment, so it would be okay to set aside a small portion of my yard to grow them. Besides, the only thing they displaced was St. Augustine grass, which is equally unnatural.

Having said all that, I had allowed this little rose garden to get in rather pitiful shape. I only had five rose bushes to begin with. One of them had died. Another is probably deserving of an intensive care unit. The rest are doing okay, but needed a fair amount of pruning to get rid of some diseased leaves and spent blossoms, not to mention some shaping. On top of that, the nearby grass had begun to creep back into the area, and as best I can tell, the mowing crew (with all due apologies to Mother Nature) appears to have treated that grass to some Round-Up last time they were here. Here’s what it looked like when I got to it this afternoon:

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The first order of business was to remove the dead grass. That didn’t take very long, given that it was dead. I also pulled out the dead rose bush. The next couple of pictures show how it looked following this clean-out.

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With that out of the way, it was time to start the restoration. First, I dug a nice, big hole where the dead rose had been and installed the replacement I had purchased earlier in the day. I forgot to take a picture of the replacement before planting it, but it’s a multi-variety graft of three different varieties of long-stemmed hybrid tea rose. The varieties are called Red Sensation (red, as you can imagine), Cool Breeze (which is a dark pink), and Orlando (a lighter pink with a purplish cast to it). It should be quite pretty, and it should provide for some nice cut flowers to place in vases around the house from time to time.

Now, there couldn’t be a worse time of year to plant roses here. Ideally, roses should be planted around January or February in this area. But when you are replacing a dead one, anything is an improvement. Besides, I purchased this one at a store that offers a one year replacement guarantee on all live plants, so I should be covered if it doesn’t do well.

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With the new plant in place (on the right in the next picture below), it was time to improve the soil. One problem I knew I had was with the sandy soil not holding water very well. I also assumed it was rather depleted of its nutrients. I started out by spreading a mixed soil containing loam, compost, and peat. Then I added a layer of just peat moss.

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Next, I added a layer of course vermiculite to help with moisture retention.

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Once the vermiculite was in place, I added some rich, loamy topsoil, which just happened to have some earthworms already in it!

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Finally, I spread all that mixture around and worked it thoroughly to give it a fairly uniform color and texture.

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The last thing I did was plant some chives. It just so happens that chives are a good companion for roses. Their scent serves to detract a number of rose pests, and their roots should help to retain the soil in between the widely spaced roses. Aesthetically, the chives should fill in the sparse space with some greenery, as well as some pretty purple blossoms. Chives also tie in nicely with my desire to add edible landscaping wherever feasible. The entire plant is edible, including the blossom.

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4 responses to this post.

  1. Looks like you are well on your way to a beautiful bed of roses! Thanks for sharing your adventures!

    Reply

    • Thank you! After reading a bit of your blog, this comment gives me great encouragement!! I look forward to more sharing over the coming weeks and months.

      Reply

  2. thoroughly enjoyed this highly informative post! Suddenly last August, (and i mean SUDDENLY) my only rose bush died! If I decide to try another, I’ll follow your planting ritual right down to the chives, and hope history doesn’t repeat itself!

    ps. This is a wonderful blog. I’m definitely following it!

    Reply

    • Why thank you! I appreciate you stopping by and sharing your thoughts. I am enjoying doing this — glad to hear it’s resonating with people!

      Reply

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